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English Quiz On Reading Comprehension Day 15 Bag

English Quiz On Reading Comprehension Day 15 Bag


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Directions (Q. 1 -10): Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

 

Digital technologies have made a dramatic impact in not just bringing the world closer for everyone but, as netizens, everyone is now part of the global village. The intimacy and the familiarity with each other, experienced in villages are now being sensed in the global digital village as well. As a result, it is easy to reach out to communities and get across the message to anyone if we have the real desire to do that. We have recently witnessed how the political and the governing process itself have been transformed in Delhi on account of the power of active communication and collaboration amongst people. Opinion making, experience sharing and building leaders overnight are the new exciting trends of the digital technologies. The potential of collaborative technologies in the context of rural upliftment, can lead to path breaking socio economic changes. Arab Spring set the stage for re imagining the world we live in, in recent times. Any revolution the world has lived through, has been the resultant of a shift in the beliefs and vision of people collectively, when large communities of people are influenced by such information which makes them think differently. In the past, the medium of such communication were books or radio or public meetings. Television and Internet have taken the world by storm and digital technologies in particular have empowered the people through timely and reliable information which can also be verified. Thus, it is exciting to envisage how the rural masses can be enthused to seek and share information about various aspects of their lives leading to better opportunities for themselves. It is a widely acknowledged fact that digital technologies hold a great promise for rural development and transformation. Broadly,  we  could classify  the  ICT  o”erings  meant  for  the  rural  sector  into  three  categories.  The  first  would  be  those solutions which are aimed at ‘empowerment’. The second would be ‘enablement’. The third category would be ‘market expansion’. Let us try and take a look at some examples of each of these dimensions to understand how ICT is making a transformational impact on the rural sector. When we examine the first dimension – empowerment – E chaupal comes up as a fine example. E chaupal, with over 6500 kiosks in 40,000 villages in 10 states covering 4 million people, is an after quoted example of efficient supply chain system empowering the farmers with timely and relevant information and enabling them to get better returns for their produce. Because of the community centric approach it adopts, the system has managed to create opportunities for providing other offerings as well to the farmers – insurance and farm management practices, to name a few. The e-governance system is the example of the second dimension enablement – with immense potential to create transparency and good governance through IT. The successful implementation of this system in areas such as land records in the states of Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and others is indeed a great step in removing the malpractices and creating assurance of rightful ownership with the citizens. In recent times, Aadhar has been seen as yet another tool to empower the masses by confirming their identities. Despite the recent judgement of the Supreme Court and the opposition to this scheme on the grounds of politicisation, security and privacy, Aadhar is a good example of ICT solution attempting to provide access to monetary benefits by establishing the correct identity and through this approach, trying to expand the rural economy by energising the dynamics of the economic system. The third dimension, namely market expansion with digital technologies, can be gleaned from several examples. Village and heritage tourism in remote parts of the country have picked up a huge momentum on account of awareness being created through online portals and thus attracting more visitors as compared to the past. Direct connect with the potential customers with the smart use of digital technologies through ecommerce has facilitated a large number of artisans and agro based small enterprises in the rural areas to bring in new businesses from new markets. Women’s livelihood is being facilitated amongst the weavers’ community in the north eastern states by marketing their products through the internet medium and thus, facilitating custom orders or o” the shelf sales without women having to travel long distances to exhibit their wares. We need a game plan for orientating of rural India with such case studies on using the technology to market their services to wider audiences outside of the rural base- be it web presence and marketing for their traditional crafts and arts or farm produce to customers globally or bring in customers to their base through smart communication strategies, marketing their villages as holiday destinations.

 

1.Choose the word which is most similar in meaning to the word ‘gleaned’ as used in the passage.

1)Dispersed

2)Ascertained

3)Dissipated

4)Garnered

5)Accumulated

 

Ans:- 2)Ascertained

 

2.Which of the following are the categories of the ICT offering in the given passage?

(A)Enablement

(B)Empowerment

(C)E- chaupal

(D)E- governances

(E)Market expansion

 

1)A and B

2)A, B and C

3)A, B and E

4)A, B and C

5)C, D and E

 

Ans: 3)A, B and E

 

3.Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word ‘classify’ as used in the passage?

1)Segregate

2)Systematise

3)Organise

4)Estimate

5)Combine

 

Ans: 5)Combine

 

4.Which of the following is/are the example of ‘enablement’ dimension of the ICTs?

(A)e-governance

(B)Good governances and transparency

(C)Marketing their villages as holiday destinations

(D)Providing reliable information

1)Only A

2)Only A, B and C

3)Both A and D

4)Both C and D

5)Only B, C and D

 

Ans: 1)Only A

 

5.What are the new avenues explored by the digital technology in rural India?

(A)Decision making, real time participation and consultation is possible.

(B)Efficient supply chain management is nurtured.

(C)Only real time status of stock availability of food grains can be maintained.

(D)It provides direct connectivity with potential customer.

1)Only A, B and D

2)Only B, C and D

3)Both B and D

4)Both A and C

5)Both C and D

 

Ans: 1)Only A, B and D

 

6.Choose the word which is most similar in meaning to the word ‘envisage’ as used in the passage?

1)Disregard

2)Ignore

3)reject

4)Imagine

5)Direct

 

Ans: 4)Imagine

 

7.What were the medium of communication before the proliferation of Digital Transformation, according to the passage?

(A)Books or radio

(B)Public meetings

(C)Newspapers

 

1)Both A and B

2)Both B and C

3)Both A and C

4)Only A, B and C

5)Only A

 

Ans: 1)Both A and B

 

8.Choose the word which is most opposite in meaning of the word ‘malpractices’ as used in the passage?

1)Breach

2)Dereliction

3)Abomination

4)Recognition

5)Good deed

 

Ans: 5)Good deed

 

9.What is the significance of Arab spring in the digital transformation?

1)It removed the social economic backwardness.

2)It had set the stage to reimagine the world market.

3)Arab oil crisis was tackled effectively.

4)All of the above

5)None of these

 

Ans: 2)It had set the stage to reimagine the world market.

 

10.Choose the word which is most similar in meaning to the word ‘intimacy’ as used in the passage?

1)Affinity

2)Incompatibility

3)Hibernation

4)Enmity

5)Inactivity

 

Ans: 1)Affinity

 

Passage 2

 

Directions (Q. 1-10) : Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions. Certain words/phrases have been given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

 

The Rajya Sabha is set to take a vital step to create a pan-Indian market for goods and services. It will clear the Bill to amend the Constitution that empowers states to tax services and the Centre to tax goods up to the retail stage. This will also    enable the setting up of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) Council with a wide mandate. The government should be commended for reaching out to the Opposition and forging a consensus on GST in the Upper House where it lacks the numbers. The task has been arduous. But it has shown flexibility on contentious issues. The new tax system can be rolled   out in April next year if the Centre and the states firm up the tax rates and transact the legal changes needed to make the shift. First, the Constitution Amendment Bill has to be ratified by at least half the states. As India will have a dual GST — central GST and state GST — Parliament and state legislatures have to enact the law on GST too. The empowered committee (EC) will work out the new tax design. The goal should be to have a flawless GST that makes production efficient, lowers   retail prices and makes our exports competitive. A combined rate of about 18% makes sense as it would be less than half   the current incidence of cascading indirect taxes on goods. Exemptions should be minimal. Convergence to a lower rate has been the rule in indirect taxes broadly since 1998. Unfortunately, there have been instances of the government breaking    the rule by bestowing concessional duties or exemptions to certain sectors. The spirit of simplification, the guiding path of indirect tax reform, must be retained. Only then can ‘Make in India by making one India’ become a reality. GST has been widely debated, but the common man does not know that India is close to signing a free-trade agreement with itself. Many industrialists are in the dark about the nature of the new tax and its benefits. This should change. The government must launch a campaign to educate people, and also the industry that would have to deal with two separate agencies for tax collection. Former EC chairman engaged with India Inc ahead of the value added tax (VAT). The panel came out with a lucid primer on GST, a brainchild of the UPA. His successor continued with the good work. Malaysia, for example, faced glitches when it rolled out GST on April 1, 2015, which is well documented. There were reportedly complaints about retailers mischarging customers, errors in tax invoices, confusion over the tax treatment of some goods and services, leading to anti-GST street protests. Inconsistencies were deliberated among friends, colleagues and on social media. In many cases,  these  were directly reported to the respective authorities that found itself facing public complaints. India’s tax administration simply can’t cope if it’s besieged with consumer complaints. Confusion over tax treatment of goods and services cannot be ruled out, if there is haggling over items to be exempted or to retain inefficient taxes. So, public attention to detail will matter when GST is enforced. A ‘Chai Pe Charcha’ is a good way to demystify GST. The success of GST would also hinge on the robustness of the IT infrastructure. The good news is the GST Network (GSTN), a special purpose vehicle set up to provide  the IT infrastructure systems and services to the administration and the taxpayers, is ready with key functions such as registration, returns and payment. The EC must quickly approve the GST design to enable the service provider to implement the system. The central and the state tax administration must be familiarised with the IT infrastructure. They should be up- to-date with the GST Act — which will replace the Central Excise Act, Service Tax Law and State VAT Act — that will spell out the tax rates, thresholds, the way to register, file returns and make payments. All this requires intensive training. A model GST law is already in the public domain. However, it is riddled with flaws that will jack up compliance costs. The EC should fix the flaws and finalise the law, holding extensive consultations with industry. Malaysia’s experience showed larger and better organised businesses managed a smooth transition to GST. Smaller and less organised businesses, besides   lacking the financial resources to access professional help, faced particular problems of their own. Some small business owners transferred operations to newly incorporated entities ahead of the deadline for GST registration. Most of this, experts said, was done in fear that patchy bookkeeping, common with businesses operating on a cash basis, could turn up problems during GST registration or random audits. Many traders in India are known to dodge taxes. Pressure from them had forced former finance minister to defer VAT in 2003. His successor introduced the new levy in 2005. It worked well and boosted revenues for states. An integrated countrywide market for goods and services is a reform overdue now to raise India’s tax collections far above the measly 16% of GDP.

 

 

1.How can ‘Make in India’ become a reality ?

 

1)Make in India can become a reality by the indirect tax reforms.

2)It can become a reality by preparing for implementation of indirect tax reforms.

3)It can become a reality by retaining the spirit of facilitation and the guiding path of indirect tax amelioration.

4)It can become a reality by introducing place of destination-based tax from the current origin-based tax.

5)It can become a reality by raising concerns over the possible dilution of the fiscal powers and potential encroachment of tax base by the Central Government.

 

Ans: 3)It can become a reality by retaining the spirit of facilitation and the guiding path of indirect tax amelioration.

 

2.According to the passage would a consumer have to pay a higher GST ?

 

A.Nothing can be said with certainty.

B.Yes, the consumer have to pay a higher GST.

C.No, a consumer would not have to pay a higher GST.

 

1)Only A

2)Only B

3)Only C

4)Only A and B

5)Only B and C

 

Ans: 3)Only C

 

3.Which of the following statements is TRUE in the context of the passage ?

 

A.India is signing a free-trade agreement with itself.

B.Many traders in India are known to dodge taxes.

C.The central and the state tax administration are interloper and venerable with the IT infrastructure.

 

1)Only A and B

2)Only B

3)Only C

4)Only B and C

5)All A, B and C

 

Ans: 1)Only A and B

 

4.How should the law be finalised by the Empowered Committee ?

1)By holding vast counsel with industry.

2)None of these

3)By informing the right appeal.

4)By cascading indirect taxes on goods.

5)By administering the tax payers in industry.

 

Ans: 2)None of these

 

5.Which of the following statements is/are NOT TRUE in the context of the passage ?

 

(A)The Pan–Indian market for goods and services will not allow the Bill to amend the Constitution a empowers that states to tax services and Centre to tax goods upto retail stage.

(B)The government should be commended for reaching out to the Opposition and forging a consensus on GST.

(C)The public attention to detail will matter when GST is executed.

 

1)Only A

2)Only B

3)Only B

4)Only B and C

5)All A, B and C

 

Ans: 1)Only A

 

Directions (Q. 6-8) : Choose the word which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

 

6.Exempted

1) Prevented

2) Hindered

3) Enforced

4) Restricted

5) Absolved

 

Ans: 5) Absolved

 

7.Besieged

1) Fastened

2) Deflected

3) Encompassed

4) Clenched

5) Repelled

 

Ans: 3) Encompassed

 

8.Patchy

1) Irregular

2) Thorough

3) Absolute

4) Integral

5) Consistent

 

Ans: 1) Irregular

 

Directions (Q. 9-10) : Choose the word which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word printed in bold as used in the passage.

 

9.Demystify

1) Demonstrate

2) Prove

3) Simplify

4) Expound

5) Interpret

 

Ans: 2) Prove

 

10.Dodge

 

1) Artifice

2) Ditch

3) Gimmick

4) Knack

5) Comply

 

Ans: 5) Comply

 

Passage 3

 

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it Certain words are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.

 

The main idea conveyed by the report is that our children do not get a chance to enjoy learning at school because the syllabus are irrationally organised, teaching is text-book, centred, and the system of examinations instils fear and encourages mechanical repetition. Textbooks developed along the lines of reconceptualised syllabus can attempt to integrate positive values, life skills, aesthetic sensibility and concern for the environment. They are interactive and make a conscious effort to point both children and the teachers towards other sources of learning such as neighbourhood, nature etc. In addition two parallel challenges deserve attention. The first is examination reforms. Rigid indifference to individual differences is the major flaw of the present system. From the quality of questions to the manner of evaluation, it favours drilled preparedness and ignores independent thought while the unrealistically high cut-offs in coveted colleges are a further sign of systemic inefficiency. It is hardly, surprising that the very thought of examinations makes the young depressed. Moreover, practices of splitting unified topics into arbitrary bits carrying small marks value encourage teachers to concentrate on scoring topics overlooking the importance of perspective and overall understanding. Little surprise that many elite high fee schools are opting for International Baccalaureate not because it offers status with its global certification but for its flexibility and respect for individual differences in learning.

 

The second area is teacher training, which suffers from obsolete notions. Most teachers are trained mainly to cover the syllabus in a mechanical exam-oriented manner. By insisting that every child move at the same pace in all subjects teachers encourage rote learning’and ridicule for those who fall behind. Teacher training, whether for nursery or secondary school teachers, should be embedded in courses which have the capacity to develop both the teacher’s personality and perspective on society by linking subject learning with reflective and creative project work. The ultimate responsibility lies with universities and institutes of higher learning to ensure the quality of all teachers. Initiatives to improve the content of teacher training courses will ensure utilisation, of desolate university campuses during summer vacations which conceal an enormous waste of infrastructure and expertise. The quality of education is a reflection of the quality of teachers and major improvements in their training and working conditions will motivate the young to pursue a teaching career,affd determine how India fares in the pursuit of economic and social development in the years to come.

 

  1. According to the author, what is the major weakness of the present examination system?
  2. a) Teachers do not take into account the nature of questions asked in the examination.
  3. b) Teachers are subjective in their assessment of papers.
  4. c) Cut-off standards for admissions to good institutions need to be raised.
  5. d) It distinguishes between a creative student and a rote learner.
  6. e) It does not consider, unique learning patterns of students,

 

Ans: e) It does not consider, unique learning patterns of students

 

  1. Which of the following factors is responsible for children’s dislike of learning?
  2. Rigid, logical, systematic organisation of syllabus.
  3. Teaching methodology which does not focus on text books.

III. Examination pattern which rewards rote learning.

  1. a) Only I
  2. b) Both I & II
  3. c) Only III
  4. d) All
  5. e) None

 

Ans: c) Only III

 

  1. What is the drawback of teacher training courses?
  2. a) They are held during summer vacations so attendance is low.
  3. b) Content is being constantly changed so teachers cannot keep up.
  4. c) Their focus is on imparting education only from an exam ination perspective.
  5. d) They focus on making syllabi interactive rather than focusing on examination patterns.
  6. e) None

 

Ans: d) They focus on making syllabi interactive rather than focusing on examination patterns.

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT TRUE in the context of the passage?
  2. a) Examinations arouse negative emotions in students.
  3. b) Weak students are at a disadvantage if teachers force students to learn at same speed.
  4. c) Holding teacher training courses only during the academic year will help teachers cover the syllabus in an exam-oriented manner.
  5. d) The responsibility for improving the quality of teachers lies in the hands of universities.
  6. e) In the present educational system rote, learning is encouraged.

 

Ans: c) Holding teacher training courses only during the academic year will help teachers cover the syllabus in an exam-oriented manner.

 

  1. According to the author, which of the following conditions will influence India’s future development?
  2. Replacing traditional educational systems with globally accepted foreign systems
  3. Improving employment conditions of teaching staff

III. Getting global accreditation for Indian college courses

  1. a) Only I
  2. b) Both I & II
  3. c) Both II & III
  4. d) Only II
  5. e) None

 

Ans: d) Only II

 

  1. What will be the impact of having an interactive syllabus?
  2. a) Teachers, and students will explore sources other than the textbook.
  3. b) Students may get distracted and perform poorly in examinations.
  4. c) Weaker students may get left behind.
  5. d) Teachers may not be able to cover the entire syllabus for the examination.
  6. e) Students and teachers alike will be over-burdened.

 

Ans: a) Teachers, and students will explore sources other than the textbook.

 

  1. Which of the following is essential to improve the quality of education?
  2. Focus on encouraging educational systems like international Baccalaureate
  3. Reducing the number of examinations students have to take

III. Lowering the cut-offs for expensive colleges so that all students have access

  1. a) None
  2. b) Both I & II
  3. c) All
  4. d) Only I
  5. e) Both II & III

 

Ans: a) None

 

  1. Why do teachers focus on “scoring” topics?
  2. a) Pressure from colleges who want to maintain high cut-offs
  3. b) Faulty examination pattern which divides topics into smaller sections
  4. c) It is an objective of teacher training programmes
  5. d) To reduce the nervousness of students curing examinations
  6. e) None

 

Ans: b) Faulty examination pattern which divides topics into smaller sections

 

  1. What is the author’s recommendation to universities?
  2. a) Encourage only creative project work for primary school teachers.
  3. b) Enforce strict rules so that only those truly interested take up teaching as a profession.
  4. c) Utilise their infrastructure during the academic year for teacher training.
  5. d) Pass on responsibility for improving teacher training content to a government body.
  6. e) None

 

Ans: e) None

 

  1. Why is the International Baccalaureate gaining popularity?
  2. a) It is a rigid well-defined system.
  3. b) It has a good reputation.
  4. c) Fees and other educational systems are too high for the quality of education given.
  5. d) It allows students some scope to learn at their own pace.
  6. e) None

 

Ans: d) It allows students some scope to learn at their own pace.

 

Directions (11-13): Choose the word which is most nearly the SAME in meaning as the word given in bold as used in the passage.

 

  1. COVETED
  2. a) desired
  3. b) priceless
  4. c) necessary
  5. d) private
  6. e) valid

 

Ans: a) desired

 

  1. INSTILS
  2. a) teach
  3. b) causes
  4. c) orders
  5. d) inserts
  6. e) invites

 

Ans: b) causes

 

  1. CHALLENGES
  2. a) fears
  3. b) questions
  4. c) disputes
  5. d) obstacles
  6. e) conflicts

 

Ans: d) obstacles

 

Directions (14-15): Choose the word which is most OPPOSITE in meaning of the word given in bold as used in the passage.

 

  1. DESOLATE
  2. a) happy
  3. b) occupied
  4. c) dejected
  5. d) repaired
  6. e) cheerful

 

Ans: b) occupied

 

  1. OBSOLETE
  2. a) stylish
  3. b) fashion
  4. c) present
  5. d) useless
  6. e) novel

 

Ans: e) novel

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